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Sunday, June 12, 2011

How To Start A Church!

It is sad that the concept of church that I grew up to love and adore is no longer that idea church of so many years ago. I was doing some research on small business and came across this article"How to Start A Church".  Now I don't like the approach  nor the idea of starting a church as if it were a way to make money.

If you have a knack for pulling together groups of people and have an earnest desire to spread the word about your particular religious beliefs, learning how to start a church could be a worthwhile idea. This is especially true if you live in an area that has a limited number of churches. If so, chances are that many people are looking for alternatives to what is currently available. Learning how to start a church isn't particularly difficult – but amassing an authentic congregation can be. You can learn some basic pointers on how to start a church by checking out the following information.
Licensing and Training

In terms of training, the only thing you really need in order to start a church is a set of beliefs that you’d like to share with others. When you have a genuine desire to spread the word about your faith and convictions, learning how to start a church is relatively straightforward.

Working or volunteering for a different church can help, but it’s not going to be quite the same as running your own religious organization. After all, a different church is going to have a different set of beliefs.

The tricky thing about starting a church is making it legitimate. In order to enjoy the benefits of being recognized as a church, you’re going to have to form a non-profit organization.

The rules for doing so vary by state, so check with your state tax authority to find out what you need to do. Study up on the strict IRS rules for churches, too, so that you don’t run afoul of tax laws for 501c organizations. Check out the IRS website for more tax information for churches and religious organizations.

Keep in mind that your church must be founded by three people – who are not related by blood or by marriage – in order to accommodate the non-profit regulations of the IRS. 
Key Success Factors

One of the biggest pitfalls involved in starting a new church is being treated like one by others. All too often, interested people misunderstand the purpose of a new church, mistaking it for a discussion group or some other thing.

From the get-go, then, make sure that your organization is always referred to as a “church.” Take care to correct people who mistakenly call it a discussion group or something else.

You should also get into the habit of soliciting donations right from the start. The funds that you accumulate can be used to print flyers and, down the road, to pay for a permanent location for your church.
Finding Parishioners

There are a lot of churches out there. People who are already committed to a particular church probably won’t be very receptive to giving yours a try.

A huge part of learning how to start a church, though, is tracking down open-minded people. College campuses are often good places to find them; community centers are, too.

Just be careful not to alienate or anger people, and make sure that there aren’t any “no solicitation” rules involved in the places where you look for new parishioners. 
Expanding Your Church

The most obvious expansion idea for any church is accruing new members. The larger the congregation, the more successful the church – at least, that’s how many people see it.

Way down the line, though, you could add programs like vacation bible school, day camps, daycare and other services for your members. You could also create a website and sell your preachings online.

An earnest desire to spread the word about your beliefs needs to be at the heart of everything that you do. As long as that’s the case, your expansion endeavors should go over quite well. Be true to your beliefs and your church will be a success – no matter what.
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4 comments :

  1. Oh wow this is shameful. I wonder how many "Pastors/Bishops" have followed this guideline to build a congregation. Someone once told me the Church is a corporation. smh

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  2. There's probably many, many who have started following this business model. I was at PimpPreacher website and they had a very interesting article comparing Lil Wayne to Paul Morton in terms of how they both got rich of of poor New Orleanians.

    The author did a study in a 9th Ward neighborhood and found that there were 18 black churches and only 6 African American owned businesses.

    http://www.pimppreacher.com/So-Many-Black-Preachers-So-Little-Progress.html

    So we see that a "church" in the African American community is a more viable business than any other in terms of the tax free money that is automatic (tithes and offerings) The more people they can pull in, the more money they can scrape out of the poor communities.

    Wicked, but true.

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  3. @Anna Renee
    Hi! I read the article you posted & I respect your opinion regarding it.

    But I will say this, I find it very, very hard to believe that the writer is really from New Orleans. For if he/she was, they would not have dared to make the statement that Lil Wayne & Bishop Morton got rich off of the poor of the city. Having lived here all of my life, and knowing the work(Wayne)/ministry(Morton) of these men, I can tell you, that this is not true. I am not a member of Morton’s church & I’m not an avid fan of Lil Wayne, so there is no need for me to defend them in that light. I’m just disappointed & disturbed by what was written. Both Morton & Wayne have truly GIVEN to the city of New Orleans, contrary to what was written. Not all was untrue, there are a couple of facts. But I believe when in doing research and having facts, if you incorporate your personal feelings about the “prosperity movement” within the church, under the guise of “enlightening” someone, then the TRUE RESEARCH, the “facts” that you intended on sharing becomes tainted, as in the article (hope that make sense). I would be very happy to elaborate further by email if you would like. I don’t want to disrespect JJBrock’s site with an extremely post. And I’m in no way accusing or patronizing you in any way for posting it, what I read just led me to respond. God bless ya!

    ReplyDelete
  4. @Anna Renee
    Hi! I read the article you posted & I respect your opinion regarding it.

    But I will say this, I find it very, very hard to believe that the writer is really from New Orleans. For if he/she was, they would not have dared to make the statement that Lil Wayne & Bishop Morton got rich off of the poor of the city. Having lived here all of my life, and knowing the work(Wayne)/ministry(Morton) of these men, I can tell you, that this is not true. I am not a member of Morton’s church & I’m not an avid fan of Lil Wayne, so there is no need for me to defend them in that light. I’m just disappointed & disturbed by what was written. Both Morton & Wayne have truly GIVEN to the city of New Orleans, contrary to what was written. Not all was untrue, there are a couple of facts. But I believe when in doing research and having facts, if you incorporate your personal feelings about the “prosperity movement” within the church, under the guise of “enlightening” someone, then the TRUE RESEARCH, the “facts” that you intended on sharing becomes tainted, as in the article (hope that make sense). I would be very happy to elaborate further by email if you would like. I don’t want to disrespect JJBrock’s site with an extremely post. And I’m in no way accusing or patronizing you in any way for posting it, what I read just led me to respond. God bless ya!

    ReplyDelete