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Friday, June 18, 2010

The StoreFront Chruch: Re Post!

You can find a storefront church in mostly any city in America but mostly in Black communities. During the era of Jim Crow Black churches were a important source of social and spiritual support for many Southern blacks. Even the poorest church was an institution that was black-led and provided a much-needed space for community participation. Black churches in the South formed separate congregations and associations after the Civil War, refusing to join white-led churches, where segregated seating arrangements and patronizingly racist sermons were the norm. During the time when thousands of blacks migrated from the rural South to seek work in cities, both in the North and the South the increased churchgoing population, was more than what some city churches could handle . Some southerns felt unwelcome at the larger black churches, which had predominantly middle- and upper-class parishioners many of whom looked down on the poorer newcomers and storefront preachers for their lack of theological training. In response the newcomers soon assembled home-based and storefront churches that resembled the churches of their hometowns. Decades later, despite increased secularism, storefront and community churches have remained strong influences in black America, offering educational and financial resources in addition to religious ministry. Today, storefront churches are still around and in a lot of neighborhoods. The storefront church is also a product of economics: many poorer neighborhoods lack the funds to build a church from scratch. Many have recently been established in Latino- and Asian-dominated neighborhoods, as well as poorer rural communities, typically serving similar functions as the storefront churches in historically black communities. These new places of worship are by no means limited to Christian denominations you have mosques and temples of faith too.


  1. Hey JJ
    Thanks for the history lesson. I don't care for storefront churches. In my opinion they contribute to urban blight several small congregations are often housed on the same block, next door, and across the street from one another. If your church has only 50-100 members and it's across the street from another church of the same size, merger needs to be discussed. There is nothing wrong with the churches but neighborhoods should have uniformity and business districts should be business districts! Dig

  2. Chicago is abundant with churches. Hundreds of storefronts, yep two, three or more to a block in some areas. We also have,(many times on the same block) big, bigger and ginormous churches. It's actually unbelivable.

  3. reverendlutionaryFriday, 29 August, 2008

    Thank you for how you have informed me as to the history of the storefront church. Your blog is a blessing to me and has inspired to greatly. Keep it up!

  4. Jackie beat me to it! ;)

    Storefronts are like Starbucks around here! Everybody wants to be a pastor. Which is alright with me, because on the other hand- mega churches are in abundance as well.

    But what can you do? As long as the gospel is being preached, you can't fault people for going where they feel comfortable.

  5. I totally agree with Mista Jaycee, as well as, Jack. I feel everybody wants to be a pastor. People should really search their hearts and make sure this is what God is calling them to do, it is easy to let our flesh enter in.

    I believe that God is a God of Excellence and we should offer our very best to Him. I can see using this as a stepping stone for growth, but if your congregation has not grown in 10-20 years and you are still on the same level...I don't know.

  6. TO ALL:
    You want something to blog, or to be angry at!!!!!


    Check it out for yourself, This concerns the majority of your readers!